Home

Antics of The Week

4 Comments

This week has been full of all sorts of activities, despite battling through more winter sickness on the weekend. Oh, the things we get up to. City folk and more consumer-driven folk must wonder what on earth I’m thinking sometimes, but I have so much fun making our lives more healthy, saving money and learning all manner of homesteading skills. The only upside of sickness is that we can’t go out much so we are getting some little things done around the place. When we don’t have a small-child attachment.

Tasty Food Stuff

The week started with an experiment in making a gluten-free, dairy-free happy-study-finishing chocolate cake to share with my Crafty Women on Crafty Night. After cutting a handful of foods out of my diet I am down to my last two suspects: gluten and wheat, which are similar, but I intend to get to the bottom of it. This week I was supposed to be adding gluten back in, without wheat, by using foods like barley. But, things got a bit too busy, too busy to think about what to do with barley and too busy to want to risk getting sick. I will prattle on about food intolerance issues another time. Back to the cake. It wasn’t bad for gluten-free, but it needs some improvements, the main one being less vinegar. I suppose I’ll need to do another cake experiment…

We ate our first homegrown oyster mushrooms this week. They are tasty! They’re a bit more mild than field mushrooms but I still love ’em. I ate some for lunch today, fried in pork lard. Then some for dinner, fried in beef dripping. Happiness! This week I instigated the lard experiments, which I will post about later.

The Husband also got busy in the kitchen, using a big stash of our frozen tomatoes to make 10L of tomato soup. The smaller garage freezer has become our preserving freezer and it is now half full of soup. And there are still more frozen tomatoes that need to be used!

Vegetables and Light

We’ve had to buy a few more veges over winter and have been unpleasantly astounded at the price of some veges, in particular broccoli and cauliflower. The last growing season was a poor one, followed by a rainy, gloomy Autumn and this is further impacting on the increasing price of store-bought veges. Although I don’t have the time to grow everything I want from seed at the moment, buying seedlings to grow is still a lot more cost-effective than buying veges from the shops. At Bunnings you can get a little punnet of 6 vege seedlings for $1.96 or thereabouts, compared to $3.50-$5 for one head of broccoli or cauliflower from the supermarket. And the supermarket broccoli is puny as. I bought one punnet each of red cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower from Bunnings to add to my brassicas in the garden. I will let them get a bit bigger before planting. It has been a pretty mild winter so far, with only a few frosts, so I might as well make use of the milder temperatures to keep adding cold-hardy crops to the garden.

DSCF1477

I also found myself in Mitre 10 Mega one day, where I bought a light for the back porch. This is the final light I needed to add to the house lot of light fittings that I have been gathering and storing for some time. The next step is getting a quote for an electrician to install all the lights in the house, a few of which will be in new positions, and to do a few other little electrical jobs.

As I was exiting the garden centre section, because, obviously, I ended up there, I found seed potatoes! I had been carefully thinking about which potato varieties to grow next season, with input from The Husband, since he was not impressed with Ilam Hardy last season and loves Agria. It’s always good to have more than one variety and to try out new things, so I am planning to grow Agria and Summer Delight as my major main crops and either Liseta or Allura in the planters for a quicker-maturing, early crop. Summer Delight was one of the varieties of seed potatoes available at Mitre 10 Mega, so I bought one 1.5kg bag. It is way early, but I thought I had better get them while I could, as I didn’t see that variety last season. I can always plant them a bit earlier with some protection. They are now chitting in the garage.

 

Tackling the Windows

A less fun activity this week was the commencement of window cleaning. Our windows have gotten so, sooo bad. Today, I finished cleaning all the windows in The Little Fulla’s room. I did such a good job, and, yes, there was a toothbrush involved, that it took ages. Well, the frames were bad! His room is at the shady end of the house. If I can get two or three window cleaning sessions in each week it won’t take too long to get the whole house done, right? I hate window cleaning. I don’t mind the actual glass cleaning, but the window frames? I’d rather clean the chicken coop. One good thing to note, though, is that I used homemade cleaners instead of nasty chemicals. For the frames I used a little vinegar in about 1/4 bucket of warm water and for the glass I am experimenting with 1/4 cup vinegar in 2 cups of warm water with 10 drops of essential oil (I used lemon). The oil is supposed to help prevent streak or water drop marks and I’m pretty happy with it so far. Who needs chemicals, man?

The Chickens

The chickens have been trucking along well through the wet winter weather, enjoying the goodness of The Orchard Pen. But on Staurday morning as I fed the chickens, I discovered that Kitty had a problem. She was barely eating, but pretending to eat, and it was glaringly obvious because she is one of the three who love to eat from my hand and get first dibs. Then I noticed that her crop looked huge. Into Chicken Hospital she went with suspected sour crop. It seems she had been drinking a lot as her crop was so full but there was only a little bad smell and spew was not forthcoming. During the day she got rid of some crop contents from both ends on her own while being kept off food and water, other than epsom salt flushes. As her crop started to go down I realised it was probably more of a case of impacted crop merging into sour crop. This means no induced spewing but massaging a few times a day. And we all know what a sour crop chicken means around here… A spewing human! And sure enough, The Little Fulla was that human yesterday. What is it with these chickens? It’s like they know things. Needless to say, we missed our planned family trip to Auckland yesterday. I hope Kitty recovers well as she is very dear to me. She is the easiest to treat of my oldies and such a lovely girl.

 

Kitty and co

Has Kitty (front) been pigging out on hay or has she eaten something weird that got stuck? Time will tell. Get well soon, pretty Kitty.

A Stone Mission

One evening we found ourselves on a stone mission. I bought a pile of used small river stones on Trade Me for $40, with the intention of using them in The Driveway Expansion Plan. That’s a new plan. Actually it’s not new, it just has a name now. We will need some more firm gravel as well, but this was a good start. The Husband went to get the stones with the borrowed trailer one day after work. But the pile of stones was a bit bigger than I thought it was. He came home in a fluster because they wouldn’t all fit in one trailer load, it was a lot of work shoveling them and he had to take the trailer back in the morning. We both shoveled and raked the stones off the trailer onto a tarp as fast as we could, which was not very fast at all, then bundled up The Little Fulla, took our shovels and headed off on a family stone mission. We shoveled the next load of stones onto the trailer, which came up to about 3/4 full. Shoveling stones is a lot harder than shoveling dirt. They look small, but they are heavy! Especially when they’re dirty and wet. It was hard work, but we gained a big pile of stones for a good price and got it done before the darkness of night descended. The arrival of more rain has helped to clean some of the stones.

At the moment, we have a short driveway with the only proper parking being the carport at the end of it. The Husband parks his work van on the drive behind the car or on the grass on the west side of the drive when it’s not too soggy. But sogginess has become a very real thing around here with all the rain we’ve had. When the road flooded and we had to do some awkward maneuvering for me to get the car out one night, wading through water with The Little Fulla in tow, it became clear that we needed to do something about parking space sooner rather than later. I have always intended to turn the bit of garden on the west side of the carport into a parking space. The main reason nothing has been done about it yet is camellia stumps. Always the camellia stumps! There are a bunch of small stumps in there that need to be dug out. Now there’s a tarp with a pile of stones sitting on top of some of them… Aren’t we good at making piles? We could be pile-making specialists. Need a pile? We’ll make one for you.

Stone pile

Our latest pile: The Stone Pile. The Husband had a small not-paying-attention-to-wife’s-directions moment, hence the wayward stones at the front.

That Patio Woodpile Area Thing

We have been continuing to chop or saw up wood from the long/large bits of wood woodpile beside the ‘covered’ patio woodpile.

Chopping woodpile

The long/large bits of wood woodpile. It looks pretty messy, but it’s a LOT better than it was before.

The patio woodpile area that The Husband has been fiddling with is not going very well. High winds keep blowing his wood and plastic covering off, leaving the wood wet again. The good news is, the wood is going to have to be moved into the woodshed now, for I have done things. Good things.

I have been watching auctions for loads of pavers on TradeMe since The Husband started doing his weird patio woodpile thing. There is a paving company that has a bunch of $1 reserve auctions every week for pallet loads of various styles and amounts of pavers. Some go for well over $100 and the cheapest I saw was $40-something. I found a small load of end-of-line pavers that I really liked the look of, worth $252, and got them for $2. Two dollars! That was totally meant to be. Now we just need to pick them up…

No More Assignments For Twiglet

2 Comments

I have been working on my assignment. Obviously, that is why I’m on my blog right now. This was my final assignment for my final paper for this course. So, my last assignment ever, unless I nutheadedly decide to do more study some time in the future. This final paper has seen me procrastinating like nobody’s business. It just doesn’t seem as relevant as looking at plants, holding chickens or watching videos with The Little Fulla of himself being himself. I found myself doing almost anything to avoid doing my assignment. Folding washing. Tidying up random things. Rearranging a kitchen cupboard. Cleaning the chicken coop. ‘Accidentally’ going on Facebook. Doing the dishes. Dishes! Doing the dishes hovers around the bottom of my ‘Things I Ought to do’ list. I would much rather clean the chicken coop. Anyway, I finished my assignment last night so now I am freeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!

Now, I am playing the game of What Shall I do First? My options range from catching up on housework to catching up on garden tasks to getting some of my 10 million projects started to sitting around like a blob watching presentations on this week’s 2017 Home Grown Food Summit. The results are inclining towards a crazed combination of all of the above.

We were at the Auckland Botanic Gardens last weekend: a happy place that always gives me inspiration, especially when it comes to native plants.

Auckland Botanic Gardens

I could spend so many hours loitering around Auckland Botanic Gardens, but a small child on foot means everything is now done in fast-forward.

The Chickens

I have whittled my flock down to what seems like a rather small number: 8. It probably still sounds like a lot to some people but I feel like I’ve offloaded a lot of chickens in a short space of time! I sold my second black Orpington pullet last week. Now I’m back to two breeds or part-breeds: Australorps and Wyandottes. And Mr Bingley is still hanging around.

Chickens

Hello, Mr Bingley! Yup, he’s still here. Behind him are Lizzie, Georgiana and Kitty. PB is hiding behind the tree.

I celebrated my selling efforts by letting the chickens back into The Orchard Pen, which has grown back some grass and had a nice rest from chickens. Kitty celebrated by going broody and my “Look, it’s a new pen to explore!” plan didn’t prove a good enough distraction to keep her from a stint in the broody breaker. Frodo celebrated by starting to go broody too and ended up in the broody breaker straight after Kitty. I got Frodo in there early before she got too far into the broodiness to stop laying. She hasn’t missed a day of laying yet in 22 days. Wow! This is a new record for her and I don’t know how she’s managing such production in winter! I’m wondering what happens if I manage to break her broodiness before it interrupts her egg-laying hormones. I legitimately asked The Husband, “Will she explode?” I’m happy for her to miss a day of egg laying, I just don’t know how that will fit into her current system of laying every day before having a big broody break. She’s currently in a weird, quiet, trance-like, half broody state but still laid early this evening.

Orchard Pen

The chickens are back in The Orchard Pen: Lizzie (front) and Georgiana. The parts that had hay spread around when the chickens were last in there have grown some nice grass. I think I shall spread some hay in the empty Cedar Pen.

I got a good, sunny day to do a full coop clean and spray this week, which always makes me feel satisfied. Then Georgiana gave me a nice assignment-finishing present today: her first little egg. Yay! On one hand, I wasn’t expecting her to start laying in winter but on the other hand it’s about time! She is 32 weeks old today. Words like ‘slacker’ were starting to come to mind, so I am very pleased that she has joined the layers club.

Georgiana's egg

Georgiana’s sweet little egg.

PB is getting a proper name. It has been so long that it’s hard to stop calling her PB, but I’m going with something not too much different: Jane B. She is still getting bigger and is currently being super-scared of me when I’m in the pen. Partly, I blame her nutty ‘brother’, Mr Collins, but I think it’s also because I keep taking her friends away, first, Mr Collins, and then the black Orpington. Georgiana was the same when I took some of her buddies away around the same age. Hopefully Jane B will settle down now that I’ll have a bit more time to just hang out with the chickens. She still sits in my arms nicely and eats from my hand when I get her out at night but she’s scared of me during the day.

Jane B

PB shall henceforth be known as Jane B. She is almost 15 weeks now.

I have been asking members of a Wyandotte group about my SLW pullet, Lorelai, aka Slow Feather Butt, and opinions are still divided as to whether she is a boy or girl, so I will have to wait some more…

The Garden

The garden has been getting scarce attention lately owing to sickness, winter weather and that assignment. It is due for so many things and I’m looking forward to getting some quality time in my garden. The Little Fulla and I did a little bit of weeding today and the other day we had a family leaf raking session out the front, as the walnut tree has suddenly decided to dump copious amounts of leaves on the drive and thereabouts. So far, some of the leaves have been put on the compost heap and some have been dumped on top of the weeds in front of the compost heap. More raking will be needed to keep the leaves clear of the gate. I am hoping to plant my garlic tomorrow and am finalising my Vege Plan, which is a lot less orange than I thought it might be. I have been eyeing up the space out the front in front of my corokia and flax hedge as a place to plant Atlantic Giant pumpkins as well as another variety or two. I just need to deal with the weeds.

I have so many plans for things I want to do outside. I have been giving a lot of thought to shelter plant options, as we are getting a lot of wind through the backyard since a) we cleared out some shrubs/trees that were giving shelter on the west side and b) the neighbours cut down some good shelter shrubs. I am also thinking about trellis ideas along the paddock fence on the east side of the vege garden. The Great Vege Garden Expansion Plan still has stages that need to be done and I have a lot of plants that need to be planted in various places. I need to hack away at stumpy in The Herb Garden.

The Husband keeps throwing a rope up into the doomed plum tree and I keep telling him that we need to cut more off the top before any felling attempts. It doesn’t look like there’s much of it left but it is actually quite tall. The Husband has also been working on tidying up the ‘firewood storage area’ at the side of the deck. In a bid to dry out the wood that keeps getting pounded by the rain, he knocked up a quick shelter with lengths of timber and some black plastic. I am trying to bite my tongue because I know that the wood needs to dry out, but a) the black plastic is cutting out some light from the lounge, b) it doesn’t look very good, c) it keeps falling apart and d) I have longer term plans of paving the area and putting clear or white corrugated roofing above it to turn it into a BBQ and tidy firewood shelf area. We have almost used all the firewood in one bay of the woodshed in the chicken pen, so we could just move all the wet firewood there…

DSCF1433

Stumpy needs to be evicted from The Herb Garden. He just keeps getting wet feet.

The doomed plum tree

The rest of the yellow-fleshed plum tree still needs to be removed. Just not in one foul, misaligned swoop.

Firewood area

The Husband’s firewood area at the side of the deck. In the high winds yesterday one of the wooden supports between the black fence and the deck roof fell down and the black plastic that was covering them blew off. It’s a work in progress. Of sorts.

My First Broccoli

2 Comments

Yes, I have grown broccoli in the garden for the first time. I don’t like broccoli. It’s not as bad as peas, mind. I don’t think anything is. I have been known to eat the occasional small (minuscule) piece of broccoli and even some cold broccoli salad, but I don’t care for it. The Husband and The Little Fulla will eat it though, and thus it has made its way into my vege garden.

DSCF6576 cp

The brassica bed, complete with weeds and evidence of a large caterpillar family.

We harvested the first broccoli floret the other day. It grew so fast I didn’t even know it was ready until The Husband pointed it out. I cut the stem off just above the four wee side florets, which will hopefully grow somewhat bigger to provide a further harvest. The broccoli was festooned with small caterpillars so The Husband put it in a large bowl of salted water to kill them off. We were surprised to see a bunch of small snails come out that evening too. I suppose broccoli is like an exciting forest fort for bugs to hide in.

DSCF6573 cp

My first broccoli. I’m pretty chuffed, even though it won’t be heading towards my plate.

DSCF6577 cp

Four wee side florets of broccoli.

I’m feeling rather pleased that I have added broccoli-growing to my forte, with very minimal effort, I must say. I’m still not planning to eat any of it though…